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Transition Words

Page history last edited by evantheus@gmail.com 11 years, 1 month ago

 

 

Transitions

Transitions act as bridges between your paragraphs. Since each paragraph offers a distinct thought, you need to connect these two distinct thoughts in some logical way for the reader. Transitions supply the logic of how two paragraphs connect, how one idea leads to the next, and how the two are related. Don't make the reader guess how one paragraph relates to the other.

 

Examples: 

"Not only is vegetarianism unhealthy for the human body, vegetarianism also creates an excess of pesticides in the environment."

  • The italicized words and phrases in the example above illustrate a transition from health hazards to environmental hazards.

 

In addition to problems of obesity, America's youth also suffers from increasing amounts of psychological stress. 

  • The italicized words and phrases in the example above illustrate a transition from obesity to psychological stress.

 

Besides violating the right to privacy, the microchip makes children susceptible to information-hacking. 

  • The italicized word in the example above illustrates a transition from privacy to information-hacking.

 

Transitions like these are particularly useful at the ends of paragraphs when signaling a change in topic. Using transitions effectively helps create a more coherent flow and structure and allows the reader to more easily follow your writing.

 

Transition word examples:

 

Subordinating conjunctions:

After                    Before                       If                    Since                Whenever

Although              By the Time                If only             Though            While

As                        Even though              In case            Until                 Whether

As Far as              Except (that)               When             Because

 

Conjunctive adverbs

Accordingly Furthermore
Instead Otherwise
Also  
Hence Likewise
Still
Besides
Henceforth
Meanwhile
Then
Consequently
However
Moreover
Therefore
First, second,...
Indeed
Nevertheless
Thus

 

Remember, you should use a comma after conjunctive adverbs.

Example: Likewise, she felt that he needed to become more studious.

 

Also, when you have conjunctive adverb that joins two sentences, you need a semicolon before the conjunctive adverb and a comma after it.

Example: We were not really impressed with the hospital; however, it did have a wonderful exercise room.

 

Same Time
Earlier Time
Now
Later Time
At the same time
Before that
At this time
Then
Concurrently
Earlier
At present
Afterward
Simultaneously
First
Now
In the future
  Formerly
These days
Later
  Previously
Currently
Next
      Soon
      Subsequently

 

 

 

Adding
Contrasting
Concluding
Additionally
At any rate
Accordingly
Also
Even so
As a/in consequence
Besides
However
Consequently
Further
In contrast
In conclusion
Furthermore
In spite of that/Despite
For this reason
In addition
Instead
Hence
In the same way
Nevertheless
Therefore
Likewise
On the contrary
Thus
Moreover
On the other hand
To conclude
Similarly
Otherwise
As a result

 

 

 

Comparing
` Adding additional detail
Summarizing
By comparison
As an illustration
Briefly
Equally
For example
In brief
In the same way
For instance
To summarize
Likewise
Indeed
 
Similarly
In fact
 
  In other words
 
  Specfically
 

 

 

 

Indicating sequence
Expressing Opinion
First, second, third, ...
Actually
Next
Apparently
Finally
Certainly
Last(ly)
(Un)fortunately
Then
Of course
Above all
Clearly
In conclusion
Undoubtedly 

 

 

 

Click on the links below for more information on the writing process:

Thesis Statements

Topic Sentences

How to Use Quotations and Paraphrasing

 

 

 

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